1966 porsche 906 carrera 6




1966 porsche 906 carrera 6

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  • You're looking at a Porsche Carrera 6. The company built about 65 of the racers between and , the cars immediately.

    The Type , soon to be known by its more popular name of Carrera 6, was Porsche's response to the appearance of Ferrari's new featherweight.

    About logo. The Porsche logo is a coat of arms that shows: a riding horse and a deer antler, framed by red stripes. The emblem is dedicated to the home city of the concern - Studgart. Strips and horns are symbols of the city, and the stallion is depicted in connection with the fact that originally in place of the city, in the year 950 there was a horse farm, around which a whole city was gradually built.

    Porsche Carrera 6 – sold for $1,, An Important Example of a Landmark Porsche Prototype. Driven by Gijs van.

    1966 porsche 906 carrera 6

    1966 porsche 906 carrera 6

    I don't remember what model year it was, but I do remember I became addicted to all things automotive from that day onwards. Performance coupes can be found for a broad range of motoring tastes and budgets, everything from a small Chevrolet Corvette Stingray or the Jaguar F-Type Coupe right up to supercar territory like the Lamborghini Haracan. Compact and relatively affordable this is how most of us first experience the supercar bug in real life for ourselves. Barely a month after the first had been completed, it was entered at the Daytona 24 Hours, where it was shared by factory drivers Hans Hermann and Herbert Linge. They have an air of mystery.

    1966 porsche 906 carrera 6

    1966 porsche 906 carrera 6

    1966 porsche 906 carrera 6

    1966 porsche 906 carrera 6

    1966 porsche 906 carrera 6

    Porsche - Wikipedia

    Like the and the Dino, the had its engine mounted midship, which was ahead of the rear transaxle. Unlike the , which had been constructed on a sheet-steel backbone frame, the was based on a light and very strong tubular steel space frame that had a The suspension was fully independent, with wishbones and coil springs at all four corners, ZF rack-and-pinion steering, and large four-wheel disc brakes inside the inch steel and alloy disc wheels. However, the company had already purchased a large quantity of new inch wheels for a planned, but cancelled, second production run of s.

    Many of these magnesium cases proved problematic early in life, and as in this car, they were replaced with new factory sand-cast aluminum pieces. The cylinder heads were of aluminum alloy, carrying sodium-filled exhaust valves. The crankshaft was forged steel, and the connecting rods were titanium.

    1966 porsche 906 carrera 6

    An millimeter bore and millimeter stroke gave a swept cylinder volume of 1, cubic centimeters. Power was transmitted to a five-speed, fully-synchronized transmission, for which a wide variety of gearing was offered, including close-ratio sets for hill climbing, at which the was to prove very adept.

    There was a large air intake atop the nose for the oil cooler, and split air intakes were ahead of the rear wheels, which were ducted to cool both the rear brakes and the transaxle. Scaling just 1, pounds with oil but no fuel, the could reach a top speed in excess of mph.

    1966 porsche 906 carrera 6

    Porsche also built nine prototypes with Bosch mechanical fuel injection the E , and two more chassis were fitted for flat eight-cylinder engines. Barely a month after the first had been completed, it was entered at the Daytona 24 Hours, where it was shared by factory drivers Hans Hermann and Herbert Linge.

    The dark blue Coupe finished 6th overall and won its class. There was little doubt that the Carrera 6 was going to be a formidable racing machine. Its first owner was business entrepreneur and occasional racing driver Werner Brockhaus. There are no records of him racing his , and in , Brockhaus sold it to a young racing driver from Reutlingen, named Helmut Leuze. Beginning with an Alfa Romeo in , Leuze had moved on to both a and a mid-engine by early He immediately found the to his liking, winning his class in his first hill climb with the car, which now bore Reutlingen registration number RT-FR The car was sold to Freisinger Motorsports in Karlsruhe, where the car was completely disassembled and stored.

    In , the car was sold to the famed Southern California Porsche dealer and race team owner Vasek Polak. In , was re-acquired by Freisinger, who eventually embarked on a lengthy nose-to-tail restoration to as-new specification. The car was subsequently purchased by the consignor in the summer of The brakes, lines, and other items were also checked, and the car is described as being in top condition, with a high level of detail throughout.

    1966 porsche 906 carrera 6

    With 13 finishes from 15 starts in and 13 finishes from 17 starts in , including many class victories, Helmut Leuze posted a brilliant hill climbing record with , certainly among the best performances by a Porsche privateer. The car recorded eight more excellent results during the season.

    With numerous class wins in the European Hill Climb Championship series over its first three years of competition, had proven itself to be an extremely reliable race car, and in the right hands, it was capable of podium finishes at almost every outing. Not only are these cars highly competitive on the race track, they ooze good looks and are considered by many to be one of the prettiest race cars of their era.

    1966 Porsche 906 Carrera 6 Sound In Action On Hillclimb



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